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NAM Election Playbook: Synergies, Not Sides

The NAM isn’t playing favorites in an election year. Instead, it’s redoubling its post-partisan approach to advocacy. NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons’ message to manufacturers: the association will leverage its hard-won, bipartisan influence to advance manufacturers’ priorities, no matter who’s in charge. 

  • “That’s what we’re about. Policy that helps people. Policy—not politics, personality or process. That’s what will guide us in 2024 and beyond,” Timmons said in a speech that helped kick off the NAM board meeting this week in Phoenix, Arizona, before more than 200 of manufacturing’s leading executives. 

Why it’s important: “Both sides want us on their side,” Timmons emphasized while recounting a recent legislative debate. That trust and respect, he said, translates into wins: agencies modifying rules to avoid lawsuits and high-level White House officials acknowledging the impact of NAM campaigns. 
  
Battles loom: But the very system enabling these victories is under threat, Timmons warned, placing the onus on manufacturers to not just build products, but to empower the NAM to utilize their voices and stories to advance policies that strengthen the economy and underpin democracy and free enterprise. 

  • Tax showdown: Any new taxes on manufacturers are a nonstarter, Timmons vowed, staking a claim in the looming 2025 tax fight and reiterating manufacturers’ call for immediate passage in the Senate of full capital expensing, R&D expensing and interest deductibility.
  • Regulatory onslaught: From new Environmental Protection Agency air standards to the broader regulatory agenda, Timmons argued that overzealous rules impede manufacturing competitiveness. He specifically criticized the new PM2.5 standards, saying the EPA “set them at a level that is lower than the EU or the UK, and imposed a compliance timeline that is far more aggressive.”
  • LNG halt: Timmons blasted the Biden administration’s liquefied natural gas export permit freeze, calling it shortsighted and detrimental to both manufacturers and broader U.S. energy and climate goals. “They want to address climate change?” he asked. “So they’re going to have other countries buying and burning dirtier energy? They want to support our allies around the world? So they’re going to force Europe and Japan and others to get their fuel from the likes of Russia?”
  • Immigration deadlock: He criticized inaction on both sides of the aisle, saying border security and workforce solutions can—and must—coexist. 

Opportunity ahead: Despite considerable challenges, Timmons sees an opportunity for manufacturers to take the lead in promoting American values and sound policies that fuel the industry’s strength.  

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